Archivos de la categoría Neurotraumatología

XVI Simposium Internacional de Neuromonitorización y Tratamiento del Paciente Neurocrítico

XVI Simposium Internacional de Neuromonitorización y Tratamiento del Paciente Neurocrítico

Barcelona, 18 – 22 de noviembre de 2014

Más Información:

Hoy cursos precongreso:

ACTUALIZACIONES EN LA FISIOPATOLOGÍA Y TRATAMIENTO DEL TRAUMATISMO CRANEOENCEFÁLICO
MONITORIZACIÓN DE LA AUTORREGULACIÓN CEREBRAL. FUNDAMENTOS FISIOLÓGICOS DE IMPORTANCIA CLÍNICA
HEMORRAGIA SUBARACNOIDEA ANEURISMÁTICA. ACTUALIZACIÓN EN LA FISIOPATOLOGÍA, MONITORIZACIÓN Y TRATAMIENTO 
MONITORIZACIÓN DE LA OXIGENACIÓN CEREBRAL EN EL PACIENTE NEUROCRÍTICO. FUNDAMENTOS, MONITORIZACIÓN Y APLICACIONES PRÁCTICAS
CONTROVERSIAS EN LA FISIOPATOLOGÍA, NEUROMONITORIZACIÓN Y TRATAMIENTO DEL PACIENTE NEUROCRÍTICO

Today: Controversies in Neurotrauma

controvnov7This course is designed to provide participants with a unique opportunity to advance their knowledge and surgical skills in brain trauma and spinal cord trauma through didactic lectures and case-based discussions with renowned neurotrauma thought leaders.

Next Courses

Principles and Treatment of Spinal Disorders for ResidentsLas Vegas, NV,

Complex Cervical Spine Surgery and Complication Management with a Hands-on Bioskills LabPhoenix, AZ,

Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery and Complication Management: (With Hands-on Bioskills Lab and Case Discussion) Tampa, FL,

Spinal Disorders for Residents Las Vegas, NV

More Information

New Book:Clinical Neuroendocrinology, Volume 124 (Handbook of Clinical Neurology)

Clinical Neuroendocrinology, Volume 124 (Handbook of Clinical Neurology)

Clinical Neuroendocrinology, Volume 124 (Handbook of Clinical Neurology)

List Price:$275.00

ADD TO SHOPPING CART

Clinical Neuroendocrinology, a volume in the Handbook of Clinical Neurology Series gives an overview of the current knowledge in the field of clinical neuroendocrinology. It focuses on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. It integrates a large number of medical disciplines, including clinical endocrinology, pediatrics, neurosurgery, neuroradiology, clinical genetics, and radiotherapy. Psychological consequences of various disorders and therapies, as well as therapeutic controversies, are discussed. It is the first textbook in the field to address all these aspects by a range of international experts.

*All contributors are recognized experts in the different fields of clinical neuroendocrinology *The book provides expanded coverage on hypothalamic mechanisms in human pathophysiology *The book includes current perspectives, diagnosis and treatment of pituitary diseases


Product Details

  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 10.59″ h x 1.06″ w x 7.83″ l, 3.22 pounds
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 456 pages

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The book gives an overview of the current knowledge in the field of clinical neuroendocrinology. It focuses on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. It integrates a large number of medical disciplines including clinical endocrinology, pediatrics, neurosurgery, neuroradiology, clinical genetics, and radiotherapy. Psychological consequences of various disorders and therapies, as well as therapeutic controversies are discussed. It is the first textbook in the field to address all these aspects by a range of international experts.

About the Author
Eric Fliers is Professor of Endocrinology at the University of Amsterdam, serving as head of the Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam since 2007. He received a PhD in Neuroscience on the functional neuroanatomy of the human hypothalamus, followed by his MD (with honors), both from the University of Amsterdam. He was subsequently trained as an internist-endocrinologist. Fliers was one of the founders of the Netherlands Brain Bank. His current research interests include the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and the neuro-endocrine response to illness. Eric Fliers is the current chair of the Dutch Endocrine Society.

Prof. Márta Korbonits is a clinical academic endocrinologist with special interest in pituitary tumorigenesis and as well as metabolic effects of hormones. She graduated in medicine at Semmelweis Medical School in Budapest and works in the Department of Endocrinology at Barts and the London School of Medicine at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in London since 1991, where currently she is Co-Centre Head. She received an MD and a PhD from the University of London and was a recipient of a Medical Research Council Clinician Scientist Fellowship to study ghrelin physiology and genetics. Her current interests include hormonal regulation of the metabolic enzyme AMP-activated protein kinase, the physiology and pathophysiology of ghrelin and endocannabinoids and pituitary tumours including familial cases. She has a large collection of familial isolated pituitary adenoma families and works on both the clinical characterization as well as molecular aspects of this disease.
She has published over 160 papers, numerous book chapters, and edited two books in the field of Endocrinology and has been an invited speaker on medical conferences all over the world. She serves on the editorial board of several prestigious endocrine journals and serves as referee for numerous high-impact journals and grant-giving bodies. She was heading the Program Organizing Committee of the Society for Endocrinology for three years, served on the Executive Committee of the Pituitary Society and ENEA and currently the European Society of Clinical Investigation and is an elected member of the Association of Physicians of Great Britain and Ireland. She has received numerous awards including the Nicholas Zervas Lectureship at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the prestigious Society for Endocrinology Medal.
She shares her time between clinical patient care, clinical research and laboratory based research as well as teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Johannes A. (Hans) Romijn was trained in internal medicine in the Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, followed by fellowships in intensive care and clinical endocrinology. He was professor and chairman of Medicine and of Endocrinology at the Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands between 1998 and 2010. Since 2010 he serves as professor and chairman of the Division and Department of Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam in The Netherlands. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Endocrinology, the leading journal of the European Society of Endocrinology. His research focuses on the pathophysiology of endocrine and metabolic regulation, with a special focus on clinical neuroendocrinolog

New Book: Neurocritical Care Monitoring

Neurocritical Care Monitoring

By Chad Miller, Michel Torbey

Neurocritical Care Monitoring

List Price:$95.00
ADD TO SHOPPING CART 

I commend the editors for their careful perspective on the current state of neuromonitoring. The individual chapters provide excellent overviews of specific neuromonitoring tools and paradigms.”

From the Foreword by J. Claude Hemphill III, MD, MAS, FNCS

While damage resulting from a primary injury to the brain or spine may be unavoidable, harm from secondary processes that cause further deterioration is not. This practical, clinical resource describes the latest strategies for monitoring the brain after acute injury. With a focus on individualization of treatment, the book examines the role of various monitoring techniques in limiting disability and potentiating patient recovery during the acute phase of brain injury. International experts in diagnosis and treatment of secondary injury explain in detail the current utilization, benefits, nuances, and risks for each commercially available monitoring device as well as approaches vital to the care of brain and spine injured patients. They cover foundational strategies for neuromonitoring implementation and analysis, including proper catheter placement, duration of monitoring, and treatment thresholds that indicate the need for clinical intervention. The book also addresses multimodality monitoring and common programmatic challenges, and offers guidance on how to set up a successful multimodal monitoring protocol in the ICU. Also included is a chapter on the key role of nurses in neuromonitoring and effective bedside training for troubleshooting and proper execution of treatment protocols. Numerous illustrations provide further illumination.

Key Features:

Presents state-of-the-art neuromonitoring techniques and clinical protocols for assessment and treatment

Emphasizes practical implementation for successful patient outcomes

Written by international experts at the forefront of neurocritical care monitoring

Provides a framework for practitioners who wish to individualize patient care with an emphasis upon the needs of the critically ill brain

Discusses the key role of nurses in neuromonitoring and effective bedside training for management and troubleshooting of devices


Product Details

  • Published on: 2014-10-10
  • Original language: English
  • 184 pages

Editorial Reviews

Review
“I commend the editors for their careful perspective on the current state of neuromonitoring. The individual chapters provide excellent overviews of specific neuromonitoring tools and paradigms.” – From the Foreword by J. Claude Hemphill III, MD, MAS, FNCS (2014-05-08) –Hemphill III, MD, MAS, FNCS

About the Author

Chad M. Miller, MD, is Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

Michel T. Torbey, MD, MPH, FAHA, FCCM, Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery and Director, Division of Cerebrovascular Diseases and Neurocritical Care, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

Enrique Ferrer, Jefe de Neurocirugía en el hospital Clínic de Barcelona: “Probablemente no volveremos a ver al Jules Bianchi de siempre” 

Fuente:http://www.caranddriverthef1.com/
La lesión que sufre el francés es la versión más grave de un traumatismo craneoencefálico
Jules Bianchi pelea desde el pasado domingo por salir del hospital tras su grave accidente en el circuito de Suzuka. El joven francés de 25 años sufre una lesión axonal difusa, la versión más grave de un traumatismo craneoencefálico. Para comprender mejor el alcance de este daño y sus consecuencias, el doctor Enrique Ferrer, Jefe de Servicio de Neurología en el Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, ha explicado la situación que atraviesa ahora mismo Bianchi y cómo, dentro de la gravedad de lo sucedido, existen posibilidades de recuperación aunque esto suponga una serie de secuelas y quedar apartado del mundo de la competición.
© Sutton – Jules Bianchi
El grave accidente que sufrió Jules Bianchi el pasado domingo en Suzuka encogió el corazón a seguidores y profanos de la F1. Las horas posteriores, a la espera de un comunicado oficial sobre su estado fueron largas y duras, pero el sentimiento empeoró cuando se puso nombre y apellidos a lo que sufre el joven francés: daño axonal difuso.

El pronóstico sin duda es poco halagüeño, pero no por ello insuperable y a falta de información sobre su grado de afectación, lo más conveniente es la cautela y ponerse en situación sobre la realidad de la lesión.

Para ello, CarandDriverTheF1.com ha contactado con Enrique Ferrer Rodríguez, Jefe de servicio de Neurocirugía en el hospital Clinic de Barcelona, el más prestigioso de España en esta especialidad.

Don Enrique ha tratado de explicar con palabras más accesibles para todos qué tipo de lesión sufre Jules Bianchi sin esconder la gravedad de la situación, pero siempre dejando una puerta abierta a que la recuperación es posible a distintos niveles.

La lesión axonal difusa es la versión más grave de un traumatismo craneoencefálico. Es el resultado de una aceleración, o desaceleración en este caso, que lo que hace es afectar a todas las áreas del cerebro a la vez, especialmente en este caso las del tronco cerebral“, ha comentado.

Este es un pronóstico que, en principio, siempre es malo, pero eso no quiere decir que no tenga ninguna posibilidad de recuperación, porque no se puede decir esto, pero a partir de este genérico de decir ‘este es un pronóstico grave’, realmente no sabes cuánto, ni cómo, ni de qué manera va a evolucionar. El contexto es muy malo pero eso no quiere decir que no pudiera recuperarse hasta cierto punto, el tema es que no sabes ni cómo, ni cuánto ni hasta donde“.

Es por eso que cree que, con una lesión de este tipo, no veremos al mismo Jules Bianchi que conocíamos antes del accidente.

Probablemente no volveremos a ver al Jules Bianchi de siempre. Desgraciadamente. Aunque me encantaría equivocarme y puede que lo haga, nunca se sabe“.

Ferrer ha recordado entonces el todavía reciente accidente de esquí de Michael Schumacher a finales de 2013 y del que ahora mismo se recupera el alemán en su casa junto a su familia. Señala que con el alemán no se ha dado excesiva información al respecto y, por tanto, lo que se han hecho han sido aproximaciones sobre su estado conforme a la información dada pero, con Bianchi es más fácil hablar con propiedad al saber, al menos, qué tipo de lesión tiene.

Esto es un poco, por la similitud, como el caso de Schumacher. En ese caso ha habido un hermetismo desde el ámbito profesional por el que no nos hemos enterado demasiado y hemos ido sacando conclusiones en función de los timings que ha ido teniendo la evolución, pero realmente no sabíamos en qué punto estaba. Entonces, cuando pasó también se nos preguntaba ‘cómo va a ir esto, qué va a pasar’ y en realidad nosotros no lo sabemos y, por saberlo, no lo saben ni los médicos que le están atendiendo… Ahora, en el caso de Bianchi, una vez que se baraja ese diagnóstico concreto sabemos que es un traumatismo muy grave con un pronóstico nada bueno“.

A partir de ahora, en lo referente a su evolución, afirma que las próximas semanas serán vitales para el piloto francés y que, a partir de ahí, llegaría una recuperación lenta.

El escalonado está en que sobreviva en las próximas tres semanas y a partir de ahí, esto se cronificaría, se haría crónico a no ser que aparezca una buena noticia, ojalá sea así, de que ha despertado y de que ha conectado con el entorno, que tendrá mas o menos secuelas pero que ha dejado de estar en esa situación de desconexión“.

Sobre las secuelas que podría sufrir Bianchi si lograse ganar esta dura batalla, Ferrer tiene claro que la recuperación nunca será completa y algún tipo de secuela quedará en el joven francés, por mínima que sea.

En caso de salir adelante, las secuelas que puede sufrir pueden ser básicamente todas. Puede ser un enfermo que quede en estado vegetativo toda su vida y de ahí, bajando el nivel de afectación neurológica, puede sufrir secuelas a muchos niveles cognitivos, a nivel de lenguaje o movilidad, pero en el planteamiento más optimista algún tipo de secuela sí que va a tener“.

Hace unas semanas, con la Silly Season en plena ebullición con Fernando Alonso como protagonista principal, muchas eran las voces que hablaban de Bianchi y su más que merecido salto a un equipo grande, quizás Ferrari, por su estrecha relación desde hace años.

Ahora, más allá de los movimientos de pilotos en la parrilla, el accidente del piloto de Marussia y la lesión que sufre, hace que las posibilidades de volver a verle competir sean bastante reducidas.

La posibilidad de verlo en un monoplaza de nuevo es muy difícil. Estamos hablando de un deportista de élite en un deporte que requiere un grado de atención, de precisión y coordinación elevadísimo, por lo que es muy difícil. La realidad es que en medicina no hay nada imposible, ni para bien ni para mal y por tanto hay que ser absolutamente abierto en todos los aspectos y poco categóricos, no sentar cátedras de nada. Ahora, eso sí, es realmente difícil que si tiene una lesión encefálica difusa se recupere lo suficiente como para subirse de nuevo a un bólido. Sinceramente, creo que la carrera deportiva de este chico ha terminado“.

Por último, el doctor Ferrer cree que aunque la relación entre su forma física y la lesión no tienen una relación directa de cara a salir mejor o peor de la misma, una fortaleza física como la del francés por su profesión, sí que puede ayudar a la hora del proceso de recuperación posterior.

El tema de la forma física no tiene relación directa. Es decir, la lesión cerebral que tenga, la tiene yendo al gimnasio diez horas al día o sin pisarlo. Lo que sí es cierto es que la fortaleza corporal ayuda a que después de este proceso traumático de desconexión cerebral el cuerpo aguante mejor y tenga menos tendencia a las complicaciones. He visto la situación de estos enfermos 50.000 veces y si los vieses cuando se están recuperando o al final de la evolución, son gente que se han quedado en los huesos, que se han consumido totalmente y han adelgazado porque no tienen un aporte de alimentos adecuado, porque no se han movido, porque han tenido una estancia en cuidados intensivos larguísima y porque luego han quedado con afectaciones que les impiden moverse adecuadamente en muchos casos, así que en este sentido, su preparación física puede ayudar“, concluyó el doctor.