Update: Falcotentorial meningioma treatment

Falcotentorial meningioma treatment

The primary aim of surgical treatment for falcotentorial meningiomas is gross total excision. The vital surrounding brain structures make this a complex task.

Several surgical approaches have been described to treat falcotentorial meningiomas. These include infratentorial supracerebellar approachsuboccipital approachoccipital transtentorial approach, and combined supratentorial and infratentorial approaches 1) 2) 3).

There are two main issues in treating falcotentorial meningiomas. One is selecting the surgical approach, which includes design of the bone flap. The other main issue is whether main venous structures will be sacrificed for a radical tumor resection.

In all of the cases, Hong et al. tried to make an adequately sized bone flap, even when the tumor was quite large. Some authors have insisted on performing wide craniotomies for large falcotentorial meningiomas 4).

Quiñones-Hinojosa, et al. 5) described a bilateral occipital transtentorial/transfalcine approach for large falcotentorial meningiomas. They ligated and cut the transverse sinus after checking the patency of the occluded sinus, and used permanent aneurysmal clips to ligate the vein of Galenwhen the straight sinus was occluded. The area above and below the tentorium can provide wide exposure and reduce occipital lobe retraction during prolonged operation times. Moreover, this approach may allow surgeons some form of intraoperative flexibility in terms of their surgical plan.

Hong et al. do not suggest routine application of wide craniotomies, such as the combined supratentorial and infratentorial approach. This is because wide craniotomies may increase the total amount of bleeding, prolong the operation time, and increase the risk of cerebral cortex injury. Moreover, it is possible to completely remove huge falcotentorial meningiomas without neurological deficit via relatively small craniotomies.

A catheter for CSF drainage was inserted into the ventricle or cisternal space through the safest area in each patient. They also designed small craniotomies through which the possible access area covered the entire tumor territory. Thus, if a CSF drain is possible, then appropriately designed small craniotomies are sufficient to achieve complete tumor resection without cortex injury 6).

There are some reports that have described usage of ligation and sectioning of the transverse sinus with or without reanastomosis 7) 8).

Although many authors have reported safe ligation of the transverse-sigmoid sinus, some complications have been described 9) 10).

Every venous structure should be preserved even if they seem to lack significant function. This will help prevent complications associated with delayed lobar parenchymal hemorrhage that can be attributed to venous infarction.

In conclusion, surgical approaches should be tailored to each patient according to the origin and direction of tumor growth, feeding arteries, and the surrounding venous drainage system.

Hong et al. found that a relatively small craniotomy was sufficient to completely remove each tumor. Moreover, they found that the most important factors for avoiding surgical complications were to preserve vital deep neurovascular structures, as well as flow through the venous sinuses.

The results showed that falcotentorial meningiomas could be cured via single-stage operations without complications by applying careful perioperative planning and a delicate microsurgical technique 11).

Videos


In this operative video, the authors demonstrate an illustrative step-by-step technique for endoscopic-assisted microsurgical resection of a falcotentorial meningioma using the posterior interhemispheric retrocallosal transfalcine approach for a superiorly positioned falcotentorial meningioma. The surgical nuances are discussed, including the surgical anatomy, gravity-assisted interhemispheric approach in the lateral position, retrocallosal dissection, transfalcine exposure, tumor removal, and preservation of the vein of Galen complex. In summary, the posterior interhemispheric retrocallosal transfalcine approach is a useful surgical strategy for select superiorly positioned falcotentorial meningiomas.

Case series

2009

From 2001 to 2005, 9 patients underwent operation for meningiomas arising from the falcotentorial junction, with some extending to and/or invading the torcula. All patients were assessed preoperatively with magnetic resonance neuroimaging and cerebral angiography. Furthermore, preoperative embolization was attempted in all cases. A supratentorial/infratentorial torcular craniotomy technique was used in all but 1 of these cases.

The average dimensions of the falcotentorial meningiomas were 5.1 x 4.4 x 4.2 cm. The angiograms revealed that these tumors were fed by branches of the internal carotid artery, choroidal arteries, branches of the meningohypophyseal trunk, and branches of the posterior cerebral artery. Preoperative embolization was achieved in only 2 patients. Five patients had gross total resection (Simpson grade 1), and 4 had subtotal resection (Simpson grade 4). Two of the tumors (22%) recurred during a mean follow-up period of 49 months (range, 17-88 months). The most common complication after surgery was cortical blindness, but all postoperative visual deficits had fully recovered at the last follow-up evaluation within several months.

An excellent outcome can be expected with detailed preoperative neuroimaging and knowledge of the nuances of the surgical technique that we describe in detail in the article 12).

2006

Goto et al. evaluated their surgical experience over 20 years with 14 treated falcotentorial meningiomas.

In the past 20 years, 14 patients with falcotentorial junction meningiomas were surgically treated. There were seven men and seven women, whose ages ranged from 34 to 79 years. On the basis of neuroimaging studies, the authors analyzed the influence of the anatomical relationship of the tumor to the vein of Galen, patency of the vein of Galen, tumor size, and the signal intensities on the magnetic resonance images to determine possible difficulties that might be encountered during surgery and to prognosticate the outcome of surgery. Depending on the relationship with the vein of Galen, tumors were labeled as either a superior or an inferior type. All tumors were resected via an occipital transtentorial approach. The surgical outcome in eight patients was excellent; in the remaining six patients, it was fair. Of the prognostic factors, tumor location especially seemed to be the most important (p < 0.01, Fisher exact test). The outcome associated with the inferior type of tumor was significantly less optimal probably due to the relationship to the deep veins and the brainstem. In this series, the occlusion of deep veins did not significantly influence outcome.

Classification of the tumor location by preoperative neuroimaging studies can be helpful in estimating the surgical difficulty that might be encountered in treating the falcotentorial junction meningioma 13).

2003

Meningiomas arising from the falcotentorial junction are rare. As a result, their clinical presentation and surgical management are not well described. During the past 3 years, the authors have treated six patients with falcotentorial meningiomas.

Most patients presented with symptoms related to raised intracranial pressure, including headaches, papilledema, and visual and gait disturbances. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a smooth, oval, or round mass, which was typically homogeneously enhancing. Angiography was useful in evaluating arterial supply for embolization, when possible, and determining the status of venous collateral supply and sinus patency. The authors detail the surgical technique used in all six patients. Postoperatively, patients experienced transient cortical blindness, which in all cases spontaneously resolved during the course of several days to weeks. They provide a comprehensive description of the presentation and surgical management of falcotentorial meningiomas.

An excellent outcome can be expected when surgery is predicated on detailed preoperative neuroimaging and knowledge of the nuances of the surgical technique 14).

2001

Okami et al. present four surgical cases. An occipital transtentorial approach was used in three cases, and a combined midline occipital and suboccipital approach in one case. Total tumour excision was impossible in two cases because of engulfing deep venous structures including the great vein of Galen. Postoperative Gamma knife radiosurgery was performed in these two cases. On the other hand, a posteriorly located tumour was relatively easy to remove, and macroscopic total removal was accomplished. In conclusion, precise microvascular anatomical knowledge is indispensable to satisfactorily excise meningiomas in the falcotentorial area without significant morbidity 15).

1995

Asari et al. describe the clinical features, neuroimaging studies, and results of surgical treatment of meningiomas of the falcotentorial junction and clarify the characteristics of this lesion based on a review of the literature and seven patients treated at their institution. The most common symptoms resulted from intracranial hypertension. Upward-gaze palsy appeared in only one patient. Computerized tomography (CT) showed no specific findings, but there was no evidence of edema around the tumor. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a round, smooth-bordered mass with a peritumoral rim, without edema, and showing marked contrast enhancement. The multiplanar capability of MR imaging delineated the relationship between the tumor and adjacent structures better than did CT. Detailed knowledge of the vascular structures, especially evidence of occlusion of the galenic venous system and the development of collateral venous channels, is critical for successful surgery; stereoscopic cerebral angiography is necessary to achieve this aim. The seven patients described developed five types of collateral venous channels: through the basal vein of Rosenthal to the petrosal vein, through the veins on the medial surface of the parietal and occipital lobes to the superior sagittal sinus, through superficial anastomotic veins, through veins of the posterior fossa to the transverse or straight sinus, and through the falcian veins to the superior sagittal sinus. The first three types mainly developed after occlusion of the galenic system. The tumors were removed through the occipital transtentorial approach with a large window at the posterior part of the falx. A favorable prognosis for patients undergoing surgical treatment of falcotentorial junction meningiomas can be expected if detailed neuroimaging studies and microsurgical techniques are used 16).


The tumors were removed subtotally or totally via an occipital interhemispheric transtentorial approach and/or infratentorial supracerebellar approach. The postoperative courses were uneventful, and no neurological deficit was detected postoperatively. Pineal region tumors with a maximum diameter of 5 cm or larger should be operated on via a unilateral or bilateral occipital interhemispheric transtentorial approach, regardless of the angiographic findings, because this permits a wide operative field and can be followed, if necessary, by an infratentorial supracerebellar approach. Selection of the operative approach for a relatively small pineal region tumor should depend on the angiographic findings: downward displacement of the bilateral internal cerebral veins and the great vein of Galen indicates an occipital interhemispheric transtentorial approach, whereas upward displacement indicates an infratentorial supracerebellar approach 17).

Case reports

2017

One representative case of falcotentorial meningioma treated through an anterior interhemispheric transsplenial approach is also described. Among the interhemispheric approaches to the pineal region, the anterior interhemispheric transsplenial approach has several advantages. 1) There are few or no bridging veins at the level of the pericoronal suture. 2) The parietal and occipital lobes are not retracted, which reduces the chances of approach-related morbidity, especially in the dominant hemisphere. 3) The risk of damage to the deep venous structures is low because the tumor surface reached first is relatively vein free. 4) The internal cerebral veins can be manipulated and dissected away laterally through the anterior interhemispheric route but not via the posterior interhemispheric route. 5) Early control of medial posterior choroidal arteries is obtained. The anterior interhemispheric transsplenial approach provides a safe and effective surgical corridor for patients with supratentorial pineal region tumors that 1) extend superiorly, involve the splenium of the corpus callosum, and push the deep venous system in a posterosuperior or an anteroinferior direction; 2) are tentorial and displace the deep venous system inferiorly; or 3) originate from the splenium of the corpus callosum 18).

2006

Kawashima et al. reported, in anatomic studies, a occipital transtentorial approach: the occipital bi-transtentorial/falcine approach, to treat such lesions. Gusmão et al. present a patient with a large falcotentorial meningioma, located bilaterally in the posterior incisural space. The occipital bi-transtentorial/falcine approach allowed an excellent surgical exposure and complete tumor removal with an excellent patient outcome 19).

References

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Okami N, Kawamata T, Hori T, Takakura K. Surgical treatment of falcotentorial meningioma. J Clin Neurosci. 2001 May;8 Suppl 1:15-8. Review. PubMed PMID: 11386819.
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Sekhar LN, Goel A. Combined supratentorial and infratentorial approach to large pineal-region meningioma. Surg Neurol. 1992 Mar;37(3):197-201. PubMed PMID: 1536024.
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Hong CK, Hong JB, Park H, Moon JH, Chang JH, Lee KS, Park SW. Surgical Treatment for Falcotentorial Meningiomas. Yonsei Med J. 2016 Jul;57(4):1022-8. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2016.57.4.1022. PubMed PMID: 27189300; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4951445.
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Quiñones-Hinojosa A, Chang EF, Chaichana KL, McDermott MW. Surgical considerations in the management of falcotentorial meningiomas: advantages of the bilateral occipital transtentorial/transfalcine craniotomy for large tumors. Neurosurgery. 2009 May;64(5 Suppl 2):260-8; discussion 268. doi: 10.1227/01.NEU.0000344642.98597.A7. PubMed PMID: 19287325.
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Hwang SK, Gwak HS, Paek SH, Kim DG, Jung HW. Guidelines for the ligation of the sigmoid or transverse sinus during large petroclival meningioma surgery. Skull Base. 2004 Feb;14(1):21-8; discussion 29. PubMed PMID: 16145581; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1151668.
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Al-Mefty O, Fox JL, Smith RR. Petrosal approach for petroclival meningiomas. Neurosurgery. 1988 Mar;22(3):510-7. PubMed PMID: 3362317.
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Hitselberger WE, House WF. A combined approach to the cerebellopontine angle. A suboccipital-petrosal approach. Arch Otolaryngol. 1966 Sep;84(3):267-85. PubMed PMID: 5296435.
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Goto T, Ohata K, Morino M, Takami T, Tsuyuguchi N, Nishio A, Hara M. Falcotentorial meningioma: surgical outcome in 14 patients. J Neurosurg. 2006 Jan;104(1):47-53. PubMed PMID: 16509146.
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Quinones-Hinojosa A, Chang EF, McDermott MW. Falcotentorial meningiomas: clinical, neuroimaging, and surgical features in six patients. Neurosurg Focus. 2003 Jun 15;14(6):e11. Review. PubMed PMID: 15669786.
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Asari S, Maeshiro T, Tomita S, Kawauchi M, Yabuno N, Kinugasa K, Ohmoto T. Meningiomas arising from the falcotentorial junction. Clinical features, neuroimaging studies, and surgical treatment. J Neurosurg. 1995 May;82(5):726-38. Review. PubMed PMID: 7714596.
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Matsuda Y, Inagawa T. Surgical removal of pineal region meningioma–three case reports. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 1995 Aug;35(8):594-7. PubMed PMID: 7566392.
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Yağmurlu K, Zaidi HA, Kalani MY, Rhoton AL Jr, Preul MC, Spetzler RF. Anterior interhemispheric transsplenial approach to pineal region tumors: anatomical study and illustrative case. J Neurosurg. 2017 Jan 13:1-11. doi: 10.3171/2016.9.JNS16279. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28084911.
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Gusmão S, Oliveira MM, Arantes A, Ulhoa TH, Morato EG. Occipital bi-transtentorial/falcine approach for falcotentorial meningioma: case report. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2006 Mar;64(1):136-8. Epub 2006 Apr 5. PubMed PMID: 16622571.

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